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Bollywood actor Sushant Singh case: Narcotics Control Bureau summons Deepika Padukone’s manager Karishma

BollyWood|: Widening its probe into the drug connection in Bollywood actor Sushant Singh Rajput’s death case, the NCB has summoned Karishma Prakash, the manager of actress Deepika Padukone, and Dhruv Chitgopekar, CEO of Kwan talent management agency for questioning. A top Narcotics Control Bureau (NCB) official related to the probe said, “We have summoned Prakash, who works as a manager at Kwan and its CEO Dhruv”. See also Bollywood: On filmmaker Anurag Kashyap's birthday, here are 7 movies of his to watch Salman Khan’s ‘Dabangg’ turns 10: Sonakshi Sinha, Arbaaz Khan thank fans From Mawra Hocane to Sajal Aly, here's how Pakistani celebrities spent their week 'Bill & Ted Face the Music': All you need to know about the Keanu Reeves comedy The official said that they have been summoned because some WhatsApp chats showed they were allegedly involved in the drug case. The development comes a day after NCB officials said they will be issuing summons to Bollywood actors Sara Ali Khan, Shraddha Kapoor, Rakul Preet Singh and fashion designer Simone Kambhatta this week for questioning. Besides Prakash and Dhruv, the NCB has also summoned Rajput’s former manager Shruti Modi and talent manager Jaya Saha for more questioning. The duo was questioned for over five hours on Monday by the NCB officials here. The NCB has already arrested Rajput’s girlfriend Rhea Chakraborty, her brother Showik, Rajput’s house manager Samuel Miranda, personal staff Dipesh Sawant and over 15 others in the case so far. Showik and Rhea Chakraborty. Image Credit: IANS Later in the day, the NCB will move the Special Court to seek a day’s custody for Showik and Sawant, to connect the dots with some new facts that have emerged in the case during the investigation. The NCB has registered a case on the request of the Enforcement Directorate (ED) after the alleged drug chats of Showik, Miranda and several others came to the fore. Rajput was found hanging in his Bandra’s Mont Blanc apartment on June 14. Besides the CBI and the ED, NCB is the third agency to probe into the death case.

GulfNews Entertainment

SSR case: NCB summons Deepika Padukone’s manager Karishma

BollyWood|: Widening its probe into the drug connection in Bollywood actor Sushant Singh Rajput’s death case, the NCB has summoned Karishma Prakash, the manager of actress Deepika Padukone, and Dhruv Chitgopekar, CEO of Kwan talent management agency for questioning. A top Narcotics Control Bureau (NCB) official related to the probe said, “We have summoned Prakash, who works as a manager at Kwan and its CEO Dhruv”. See also Bollywood: On filmmaker Anurag Kashyap's birthday, here are 7 movies of his to watch Salman Khan’s ‘Dabangg’ turns 10: Sonakshi Sinha, Arbaaz Khan thank fans From Mawra Hocane to Sajal Aly, here's how Pakistani celebrities spent their week 'Bill & Ted Face the Music': All you need to know about the Keanu Reeves comedy The official said that they have been summoned because some WhatsApp chats showed they were allegedly involved in the drug case. The development comes a day after NCB officials said they will be issuing summons to Bollywood actors Sara Ali Khan, Shraddha Kapoor, Rakul Preet Singh and fashion designer Simone Kambhatta this week for questioning. Besides Prakash and Dhruv, the NCB has also summoned Rajput’s former manager Shruti Modi and talent manager Jaya Saha for more questioning. The duo was questioned for over five hours on Monday by the NCB officials here. The NCB has already arrested Rajput’s girlfriend Rhea Chakraborty, her brother Showik, Rajput’s house manager Samuel Miranda, personal staff Dipesh Sawant and over 15 others in the case so far. Showik and Rhea Chakraborty. Image Credit: IANS Later in the day, the NCB will move the Special Court to seek a day’s custody for Showik and Sawant, to connect the dots with some new facts that have emerged in the case during the investigation. The NCB has registered a case on the request of the Enforcement Directorate (ED) after the alleged drug chats of Showik, Miranda and several others came to the fore. Rajput was found hanging in his Bandra’s Mont Blanc apartment on June 14. Besides the CBI and the ED, NCB is the third agency to probe into the death case.

GulfNews UAE

Why you should consider NEAT in your daily routine

Health|: If you have been patting your back for getting in your daily dose of exercise, that’s a great start but you also need to keep an eye on your daily movement and activity for optimal health. Weight loss can actually become incidental if, in addition to regular exercise, you eat healthy and if you adopt non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT). What is NEAT? Imagine it’s a Friday and you have woken up bright and early to get your one hour of workout in, then you head home and go into hibernation watching Netflix for the rest of the day. Despite working out, you wonder how you are not shedding the pounds. Well, there are two main reasons according to Dr Manoj Kumar Nair, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Specialist at the Dubai Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation Centre. Taking a flight of stairs, walking from the parking lot to the office or a grocery store and cooking or cleaning are all forms of NEAT. Dr Manoj Kumar Nair, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Specialist Firstly, what did you eat after the workout? It is important to count calories even if the food is healthy so that you can maintain your calories to avoid weight gain or aim for a calorie deficit by the end of the day if you intend to lose weight. Dr Nair says, “It is important to bear in mind that not all calories are equal so while you definitely need to think of calories as sometimes healthy food options can be too high in calories. It’s also important to think of where the calories are coming from. For example, 100 calories from an apple is better for you than 100 calories from chips and the apple will keep you fuller for longer. “You can enjoy these foods but bear in mind that it should be made without additional sugars and you need to eat sensibly for the rest of the day so that you don’t exceed your calorie intake. Basically, one hour of workout does not compensate for eating all you can during the rest of the day.” Secondly, what you have not taken into consideration is the lack of mobility after your workout session - you are missing out on NEAT. Why is NEAT so important? Activity thermogenesis can be broken up into two categories: Exercise activity thermogenesis and non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT). Dr Nair says, “NEAT is the energy expended for everything we do when we’re not sleeping or exercising (hence the “non-exercise”). “Taking a flight of stairs, walking from the parking lot to the office or a grocery store and cooking or cleaning are all forms of NEAT and the good news is they all burn calories, and more than we would expect. Studies have shown that NEAT can burn around an extra 350 Kcal/day if properly executed. This is equivalent to running 5km a day at a pace of 10km/hr. However, he warns that before you think you can skip your daily workout, remember – both exercise and non-exercise activity thermogenesis are important. “You can’t skip either and you need to track your food as well as get enough sleep.” Further explaining how the concept of NEAT works, Dr Nair says, “Our jobs, especially if we have desk jobs, impact our levels of NEAT greatly. Anyone working in an occupation that requires you to be on your feet, such as nurses, moving about or engaging in any physical activity – would have high levels of NEAT. However, for those who are mainly working on desk jobs the level of NEAT will be very low.” The good news is there are certainly ways to increase NEAT even when working in a sedentary occupation. “You need to consciously up your NEAT activity because compared to a desk job anyone with a more active job will burn a lot more calories than you would. Take the stairs when possible, take regular breaks from your desk job and do a quick walk around as well as get some stretches in to prevent posture and muscle problems. Park your vehicle as far as possible from the entrance. Once home, after you take a break, try to stay active with home chores. On the days you are unable to get exercise, remember even 15 minutes make a difference. “While resting during the weekend is important, do not let the weekends go by without sufficient movement,” says Dr Nair. “These few things might feel overwhelming but once you make it a habit, it becomes a way of life and then weight loss becomes incidental. I always tell my clients to focus on health and well-being by adopting right daily practices. In a nutshell, every step counts.” 10 points for optimal health and well-being 1. Get regular yearly health check-ups 2. Medication compliance and regular follow-ups 3. Healthy foods can be high in calories so consider the total calories you consume per day 4. No fad diets or skipping meals 5. Exercise regularly at least 30 minutes five times a week 6. NEAT: Make sure you are moving enough per day 7. Take a five-minute break after every hour of work to stretch your muscles. 8. Sleep schedule: Set a proper sleep schedule and get at least 7 hours of sleep per night 9. Stay active during weekends 10. Meditate or practice mindfulness activities such as yoga, long walks on the beach and spend time in nature to manage stress levels. Source: Dubai Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation Centre

GulfNews Business

FedEx will soon have unmanned aircraft for some of its deliveries

Aviation|: New York: FedEx Corp. is looking at using small self-flying cargo planes to serve remote areas after experimenting with a technology startup on autonomous aircraft, said CEO Fred Smith. The effort builds on the courier's work with Silicon Valley's Reliable Robotics, which was founded by veterans of Elon Musk's Space Exploration Technologies Corp. With approval from the US Federal Aviation Administration, Reliable Robotics demonstrated in June a fully automated remote landing of a Cessna 208 Caravan turboprop owned by FedEx. See More Dubai’s five-year Retirement Visa: It just got easier to apply The easiest way to book a COVID-19 test in the UAE UAE: Can my employer enforce a non-compete clause against me? UAE: How to report workplace harassment? "This initiative deals with small turboprop airplanes and in this particular case the single-engine C208, which we're looking at putting in very remote and uninhabited areas as part of our network," Smith said. FedEx pilots shouldn't be concerned about robots stealing their jobs - for now. It would take decades for technology to replace humans in piloting large freighters, Smith said. "FedEx has no plans to replace its trunk aircraft fleet with autonomous aircraft," said Smith, a former pilot in the US Marine Corps. "And I might add on the basis of my 50-plus years of experience in aviation, I think the prospect of large transport aircraft being flown without pilots is highly remote and not something that our crew-force should be worried about in foreseeable future."

GulfNews UAE

COVID-19: UAE doctors recommend spectacles as protection for high-risk groups

Health|: Abu Dhabi: People wearing glasses full-time may have some added protection from COVID-19, but it is still well-known precautionary measures like mask wearing and handwashing that provide the best defence, doctors have said. Wearing eye protection is mainly recommended for people in high-risk groups within crowded, indoor spaces. For others, face masks, regular handwashing and social distancing are still the most effective precautions against COVID-19. See more Shelby GT 500: The most powerful Ford Mustang reaches the UAE In Pictures: UAE Team Emirates' Tadej Pogacar spot on in Tour de France More COVID-19 rapid screening centres opened with Dhs50 per test COVID-19: Beards and masks, do they really go together? UAE Expats speak China study So far, no large-scale studies have been conducted to show the exact amount of protection eyeglasses offer. However, a widely reported study of 276 people admitted to a China hospital over a 47-day period had noted that the proportion of people admitted to the hospital with COVID-19 was far less than the proportion of people of similar age who wore glasses in the area’s general population. Specifically, only 6 per cent of the admitted COVID-19 patients who were part of the peer-reviewed study had worn glasses for more than eight hours a day. In contrast, 30 per cent of people of similar age in the area wear glasses for more than eight hours daily. No proper study Dr Boopathy Murugavel “[This study] is more of more observational and anecdotal rather than a proper study, so its findings [should] be taking with a pinch of salt,” said Dr Boopathy Murugavel, ophthalmology specialist at Aster Hospital, Al Qusais. Dr Sunil GT, specialist ophthalmologist at Burjeel Hospital, Abu Dhabi, agreed, saying that a larger sample size is needed to determine how protect wearing glasses can be. “[This study] has drawn its conclusions after analysing patient data from a hospital in a small province in China. The [number of people studied] is negligibly small to make any such analysis, and the data cannot be generalised. We have to conduct the study on a larger group across a larger geographical area to get insight into this,” he explained. Dr Sunil GT With that being said, the doctors did add that glasses do act as some kind of a barrier against aerosolised particles in the air that are carrying the coronavirus. “Eyes are one of the entry points through which the virus may enter our body and cause infection. The ocular surface and the tear sacs contain ACE-type 2 cell receptors, which is known to be the entry point for the virus. So the virus can get through when we tough our eyes with infected hands,” Dr GT said. Touching the eyes more risky “To some extent, glasses act as a protective shield, preventing the entry of the coronavirus through the eyes. More than that though, it helps prevent the involuntary touching with of the eyes with unclean fingers and hands,” he added. Dr Murugavel also cautioned that glasses still allow for the virus to get through, and are not fully protective. “Wearing any form of spectacles may reduce the risk of contracting the infection through droplets, but the virus can still reach the eyes through the exposed upper, lower and side of the glasses. And even people who wear glasses can get infected if they touch or rub their eyes after touching an infected surface,” he said. This is the reason why glasses have not been recommended as essential personal protective equipment during the pandemic. Glasses with PPE “Protective safety goggles that cover the eyes, as well as the areas exposed by regular glasses, are rather advised — in addition to other protective gear — for health care workers who are required to work in proximity with patients, especially those on COVID-19 duty, as well as those involved in aerosol-generating procedures,” Dr Murugavel said. “[Other than that], it is not absolutely essential for everyone to wear safety goggles, especially in countries like the UAE where it is mandatory for everyone to wear masks when stepping outside of their homes,” he said. High-risk groups Zero-power glasses can serve as an extra protective purpose for high-risk individuals. Picture for illustrative purposes. Image Credit: Shutterstock The elderly, and those with reduced immunity can also benefit from protective eyewear. “Glasses may help in preventing the virus from entering our body through the eyes. So, people belong to high-risk groups, like the elderly and the immunocompromised, can chooses to wear glasses in public, or when they are in crowded and closed spaces. Having said that, it is crucial that they [still] maintain social distancing, wear face masks, and continue to regularly sanitise their hands,” Dr GT said. Sanitising glasses Dr Safdar Zabeth, general practitioner at Medcare Medical Centre, Discovery Gardens and Motor City, said zero-power glasses can serve this extra protective purpose for high-risk individuals. But he said it is just as important to keep eyewear clear. “Glasses should be washed with soap water or any kind of hand sanitiser spray after returning home,” he said. Dr Safdar Zabeth When seeking protection from COVID-19, face masks offer better protection when worn by everyone: they prevent the infected from transmitting coronavirus-carrying droplets, and shield more accessible virus entry points — the nose and mouth — in healthy individuals. Most effective measures Social distancing keeps the infected away from others, even in cases where people are asymptomatic, or not known to be infected. Finally, regular handwashing ensures that virus-carrying particles picked up when touching contaminated surfaces are not transmitted through the nose, mouth or eyes when touching the face unintentionally.

GulfNews TOP

COVID-19: UAE doctors recommend spectacles as protection for high-risk groups

Health|: Abu Dhabi: People wearing glasses full-time may have some added protection from COVID-19, but it is still well-known precautionary measures like mask wearing and handwashing that provide the best defence, doctors have said. Wearing eye protection is mainly recommended for people in high-risk groups within crowded, indoor spaces. For others, face masks, regular handwashing and social distancing are still the most effective precautions against COVID-19. See more Shelby GT 500: The most powerful Ford Mustang reaches the UAE In Pictures: UAE Team Emirates' Tadej Pogacar spot on in Tour de France More COVID-19 rapid screening centres opened with Dhs50 per test COVID-19: Beards and masks, do they really go together? UAE Expats speak China study So far, no large-scale studies have been conducted to show the exact amount of protection eyeglasses offer. However, a widely reported study of 276 people admitted to a China hospital over a 47-day period had noted that the proportion of people admitted to the hospital with COVID-19 was far less than the proportion of people of similar age who wore glasses in the area’s general population. Specifically, only 6 per cent of the admitted COVID-19 patients who were part of the peer-reviewed study had worn glasses for more than eight hours a day. In contrast, 30 per cent of people of similar age in the area wear glasses for more than eight hours daily. No proper study Dr Boopathy Murugavel “[This study] is more of more observational and anecdotal rather than a proper study, so its findings [should] be taking with a pinch of salt,” said Dr Boopathy Murugavel, ophthalmology specialist at Aster Hospital, Al Qusais. Dr Sunil GT, specialist ophthalmologist at Burjeel Hospital, Abu Dhabi, agreed, saying that a larger sample size is needed to determine how protect wearing glasses can be. “[This study] has drawn its conclusions after analysing patient data from a hospital in a small province in China. The [number of people studied] is negligibly small to make any such analysis, and the data cannot be generalised. We have to conduct the study on a larger group across a larger geographical area to get insight into this,” he explained. Dr Sunil GT With that being said, the doctors did add that glasses do act as some kind of a barrier against aerosolised particles in the air that are carrying the coronavirus. “Eyes are one of the entry points through which the virus may enter our body and cause infection. The ocular surface and the tear sacs contain ACE-type 2 cell receptors, which is known to be the entry point for the virus. So the virus can get through when we tough our eyes with infected hands,” Dr GT said. Touching the eyes more risky “To some extent, glasses act as a protective shield, preventing the entry of the coronavirus through the eyes. More than that though, it helps prevent the involuntary touching with of the eyes with unclean fingers and hands,” he added. Dr Murugavel also cautioned that glasses still allow for the virus to get through, and are not fully protective. “Wearing any form of spectacles may reduce the risk of contracting the infection through droplets, but the virus can still reach the eyes through the exposed upper, lower and side of the glasses. And even people who wear glasses can get infected if they touch or rub their eyes after touching an infected surface,” he said. This is the reason why glasses have not been recommended as essential personal protective equipment during the pandemic. Glasses with PPE “Protective safety goggles that cover the eyes, as well as the areas exposed by regular glasses, are rather advised — in addition to other protective gear — for health care workers who are required to work in proximity with patients, especially those on COVID-19 duty, as well as those involved in aerosol-generating procedures,” Dr Murugavel said. “[Other than that], it is not absolutely essential for everyone to wear safety goggles, especially in countries like the UAE where it is mandatory for everyone to wear masks when stepping outside of their homes,” he said. High-risk groups Zero-power glasses can serve as an extra protective purpose for high-risk individuals. Picture for illustrative purposes. Image Credit: Shutterstock The elderly, and those with reduced immunity can also benefit from protective eyewear. “Glasses may help in preventing the virus from entering our body through the eyes. So, people belong to high-risk groups, like the elderly and the immunocompromised, can chooses to wear glasses in public, or when they are in crowded and closed spaces. Having said that, it is crucial that they [still] maintain social distancing, wear face masks, and continue to regularly sanitise their hands,” Dr GT said. Sanitising glasses Dr Safdar Zabeth, general practitioner at Medcare Medical Centre, Discovery Gardens and Motor City, said zero-power glasses can serve this extra protective purpose for high-risk individuals. But he said it is just as important to keep eyewear clear. “Glasses should be washed with soap water or any kind of hand sanitiser spray after returning home,” he said. Dr Safdar Zabeth When seeking protection from COVID-19, face masks offer better protection when worn by everyone: they prevent the infected from transmitting coronavirus-carrying droplets, and shield more accessible virus entry points — the nose and mouth — in healthy individuals. Most effective measures Social distancing keeps the infected away from others, even in cases where people are asymptomatic, or not known to be infected. Finally, regular handwashing ensures that virus-carrying particles picked up when touching contaminated surfaces are not transmitted through the nose, mouth or eyes when touching the face unintentionally.

GulfNews Entertainment

Ellen DeGeneres makes on-air apology, vows a ‘new chapter’

TV|: Ellen DeGeneres used her opening monologue of the new season of her daytime talk show to address allegations of a toxic work environment, apologising for things “that never should have happened.” “I know that I’m in a position of privilege and power and I realise that with that comes responsibility, and I take responsibility for what happens at my show,” she said in a video posted Monday. See also Can Japan's ancient Noh theatre survive COVID-19? 10 films and shows to stream in the UAE in September All the cool, fun activities you’ve missed in the UAE in the last 6 months Bollywood actor Rajkummar Rao turns 36: Little-known facts about the actor DeGeneres smiled frequently but appeared strained during her remarks. She included several quips that lightened the tone but didn’t match the seriousness of the allegations. ‘The Ellen DeGeneres Show’ started its 18th season in Los Angeles with the host on stage for the first time in months after taping from DeGeneres’s home during quarantine. There wasn’t a studio audience but a virtual one, with faces beamed in on monitors put in the audience seats. “We have had a lot of conversations over the last few weeks about the show, our workplace, and what we want for the future,” she said. “We have made the necessary changes and today we are starting a new chapter.” Three of the show’s producers exited over the summer amid allegations of a dysfunctional workplace that harboured misbehaviour, including sexual misconduct and racially insensitive remarks. In her monologue, DeGeneres drily joked that her summer was “super-terrific.” The host also addressed the allegations that the off-camera DeGeneres is very different than her sunny on-air persona. ‘The truth is I am that person that you see on TV,’ she said. “I am also a lot of other things,” she said. “I get sad. I get mad. I get anxious. I get frustrated. I get impatient. And I am working on all of that.” The comedian, who is gay, noted that she’s played a straight woman on screen and considers herself “a pretty good actress,” but not good enough to “come out here every day for 17 years and fool you. This is me.” An internal company investigation of work conditions was prompted by a BuzzFeed News report in July based on 36 interviews with ex-staffers, who complained about or said they witnessed improper and unfair treatment. The people making the claims were not identified. “I learnt that things happened here that never should have happened. I take that very seriously, and I want to say I am so sorry to the people that were affected,” DeGeneres said in her monologue. She was joined later by guest Tiffany Haddish. The comedian and host had sent a memo to her staff after the BuzzFeed report, recalling her early promise of ensuring a workplace where “everyone would be treated with respect.” Something changed, she said, “and for that, I am sorry.” In a July statement, Warner Bros said parent company WarnerMedia’s investigation revealed what it called “some flaws in the show’s daily management.” Although not all of the allegations were corroborated, the studio said it was “disappointed that the primary findings of the investigation indicated some deficiencies related to the show’s day-to-day management.”

GulfNews Business

Expat Indians must think of a second source of income with property

Analysis|: As the world moves to take stock of COVID-19 impact and its aftermath, we can’t help but stress on the importance of securing alternate sources of income. Every industry is feeling the challenges thrown up by the pandemic. Revenues and cashflows have stuttered and this has unfortunately resulted in job losses, furloughs and pay cuts. In this crisis, it is interesting to note that investors have carefully deployed their funds across multitude of products. The wise ones are using rock-bottom prices to buy into products that had earlier been beyond their investment appetite. See More Race to rescue animals as Brazilian wetlands burn COVID-19: Taj Mahal reopens even as India coronavirus cases soar Photos: Rescue under way to save 180 stranded whales in Australia Photos: Plant hunters race to collect rare species before they're gone This is in line with our belief that the best way to make money is to invest when the markets are down or recovering. A bullish market significantly reduces the quantum of return you can make on your investment. However, in the earlier case, investors stand to make disproportionate returns on their returns once markets recover from the turmoil. Signalling a partial uptick We have seen a revival of demand in Indian real estate. The products we offered were from the top tier, and we had developers offering assured rental guarantee up to 60 months on residential properties and up to 20 years on commercial. These are in addition to the schemes where the major chunk of liquidity outflow for investors happens only at possession. However, the underlying trend beyond these transactions highlighted a unique perspective - NRI investors are looking at securing a second source of income. COVID-19 has forced NRIs to relook at real estate investments. The earlier demand for a home in India has changed to the tune of acquiring an asset offering similar lifestyle and amenities as seen abroad. The end-user who was looking at buying a one-bedroom apartment is now looking at 1.5/2 options because of the possible flexibility required in work/learn from home environments. The investors sitting on the fence have sprung into action to take advantage of multiple factors like rock-bottom prices, regulatory benefits on stamp duty, and depreciating currency, among others. Prepare for Plan B One of the harsh learnings for NRIs from COVID-19 has been recognizing the fact that life in a foreign country comes with an expiry date. The virus brought in a lot of uncertainty in terms of this date. It could be tomorrow... or it could be 15 years from now. A relocation always comes with its own set of problem. NRIs have shown a dedicated effort to mitigate at least one of those challenges – finding an income source after returning to India. The equity markets are unpredictable and any returns made here comes with a high-risk premium. Gold has reached sky-high levels and a lot of support will be required to keep it there, let alone move upwards in future. With Indian banks reducing interest rates on deposits, keeping your money in the bank is approaching points of negative return after factoring in inflation. An informed decision to purchase real estate at this moment guarantees the investor of making significant return on their investment. Commercial properties can yield 10-12 per cent return on the capital invested while Grade A residential projects will generate up to 4 per cent rental return. All this comes with the security of owning a tangible asset. The manner and speed in which the ecosystem of real estate is evolving to tackle the effects of COVID-19 is proof that the road to recovery is approaching sooner than expected. The fact that new launches have reduced significantly has caused demand to match up with supply. In the near future, this demand is predicted to eclipse supply and leading to a rise in prices. To book profits when that happens, you need to invest now. Like the famous phrase goes, “The object in the mirror is closer than it appears”, the real estate uptick is just around the corner. NRIs would do well to use this opportunity to play the sector and secure a much needed second source of income in the process. - Shajai Jacob is CEO - GCC, ANAROCK Property Consultants.

GulfNews Entertainment

‘Pandemmys’ sees another record low in viewership

HollyWood|: The novelty of television stars getting Emmy Awards delivered to their homes wasn’t enough to keep the annual show from slipping further in popularity. The Nielsen company said 6.1 million people watched the Emmys on Sunday night, down from 6.9 million in 2019 and the third straight year of record low viewership. See also Photos: A preview of the world's first 'Rolling Stones' store Photos: Bollywood actress Sunny Leone heats up Los Angeles Bengaluru drug case: Who is arrested actor Sanjjanaa Galrani? Sara Ali Khan to Ananya Panday: See how Bollywood star kids are spending summer The Emmys faced competition from both NFL football and the NBA Western Conference finals. The coronavirus pandemic eliminated any chance fans had of seeing stars on a red carpet, although host Jimmy Kimmel gamely tried to make do in a mostly empty auditorium with actors accepting awards remotely. Still, it illustrated how the Emmy Awards are becoming a boutique event. Last year was the first time viewership slipped under 10 million people. As recently as 2013, the Emmys had 17.6 million viewers. The Emmys were once a celebration of all things television timed for the beginning of a new fall season. Yet the pandemic has delayed the return of many favourite shows. Viewership is also fragmented across many different networks and streaming services, and several shows don’t have a wide audience. Of the 128 Emmys awarded before and during Sunday’s show, 18 went to the Big Four broadcast networks ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox. HBO dominated with 30 awards and Netflix had 21. Reginald Hudlin, an executive producer of the Emmys telecast, said Monday that it has been hard for all of the major awards shows to get the audiences that they had been used to. “We’re not three networks anymore,” Hudlin said. “We went from three networks to 60 with cable, and with streaming services there’s just endless choice. “So people are now used to watching a show that’s specifically for them,” Hudlin told a webinar organised by the law firm Fox Rothschild on Monday. “No matter how narrow that audience is, there’s a show that speaks to, ‘I’m a left-handed person who loves fishing’ ... And the challenge is there’s not a thing that connects to everybody.” The Canadian comedy ‘Schitt’s Creek,’ which was once shown on Netflix but has since been airing on the little-known Pop TV network, swept the comedy awards. It won seven trophies during Sunday’s show and 10 overall. Since the show was structured to front-load the comedy awards, the Emmys were on the air for an hour Sunday before any show other than ‘Schitt’s Creek’ won an award. ABC and Kimmel, mindful of being accused of airing an obscenity, flashed the show’s name on the screen every time the title was mentioned.

GulfNews Sports

IPL 2020 in UAE: Padikkal, Saini may ease lot of headaches for Virat Kohli

IPL|: Dubai: Yuzvendra Chahal, the go-to man for Royal Challengers Bangalore for wickets, had answered to their prayers once again on Monday when he picked up three key wickets to shape their thrilling 10-run win over Sunrisers Hyderabad. However, the main positives for the winners - to my mind - was the way debutant Devdutt Padikkal and Navdeep Saini came to the party. One of the key reasons behind Challengers’ failure to end their jinx in the Indian Premier League (IPL) had been their over-reliance on the talismanic skipper Virat Kohli and the weakness of leaking runs at the death. While it’s still very early days, but one can see the promise of young Pallikal giving Kohli and AB de Villiers the liberty to give more muscle to their middle order while Saini can prove to be a handful to get away with his ability to hit the 140kmph-plus mark consistently, an unerring line and yorkers. SEE MORE IPL 2020 in UAE: Sunrisers Hyderabad vs Royal Challengers Bangalore in pictures UAE: Cricket fans watch Delhi Capitals face off against Kings XI Punjab IPL 2020 in UAE: Delhi Capitals take on Kings XI Punjab UAE wins Tour de France: Tadej Pogacar youngest post WWII champion As the social media went agog with praise for the duo, there were a few snide remarks that it ultimately took a half-century from the Karnataka opener in IPL to come into the light - and it’s justified. His form had been one of the talking points in the 2019-20 domestic season when the calm-headed youngster shone bright in all forms of white ball cricket. In the Vijay Hazare Trophy, Padikkal scored 609 runs at an average of 67.66 as Karnataka went on to lift the title. Those runs included two hundreds and five half-centuries as well. In the shortest format, the 20-year-old had been batting like a dream as he scored 580 runs at an average of 64.45 which includes five fifties and a ton. These runs have come at a strike-rate of 175.75 and explains the franchise’s decision to go for him in the auction. Saini, who took two for 25, has been a part of India’s white ball set-up for an about an year now and should use this season to pick the great Dale Steyn’s brains to sharpen his armoury. It was a lacklustre performance from the Sunrisers batsmen, with the exception of Jonny Bairstow and the experienced Manish Pandey. While skipper David Warner was unfortunate to be run out in that fashion, but you cannot expect him and Bairstow to deliver in match after match in such a long tournament. The think tank needs to find a way to bring in Kane Williamson immediately at the expense of Mohammad Nabi as the fourth foreigner. He is too valuable a player to be sitting out when the middle order looks wafer thin on experience and ability.