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Tip Jar: Twitter lets people leave tips for some tweeters

Media|World|: San Francisco: Twitter on Thursday began letting some users add virtual tip jars to accounts so people can support their tweets by tossing in money. A limited number of users around the world who tweet in English can add a "Tip Jar" feature to their profiles, according to Twitter senior product manager Esther Crawford. The group included creators, journalists, experts, and non-profits. "You drive the conversation on Twitter and we want to make it easier for you to support each other beyond Follows, Retweets, and Likes," Crawford wrote in a blog post. "This is a first step in our work to create new ways for people to receive and show support on Twitter - with money." A Tip Jar icon on a profile page indicates an option to be taken to services such as Patreon, PayPal or Venmo to send money to a creator, according to Crawford. Twitter does not take any cut of tips, she said. "Soon, more people will be able to add Tip Jar to their profile and we'll expand to more languages," Crawford said. The one-to-many global messaging platform is keen to broaden its ranks of users and get people spending more time at the service. Twitter last week reported weaker-than-expected earnings and disappointing user growth. Twitter has struggled to expand beyond its core audience of celebrities, journalists and political leaders, even if it has become an important forum for policy debates. Twitter has faced challenges in tackling misinformation and abusive content even as it strives to become a platform for political discourse.

GulfNews Technology

Google is turning on two-factor authentication by default

Media|: San Francisco: To secure users from online security threats, Google is reportedly enabling two-factor authentication (2FA) on Google accounts by default for users. Users who have set up 2FA will be asked to confirm the right person is signing in to an account by tapping a prompt on their phone. "At Google, keeping you safe online is our top priority, so we continuously invest in new tools and features to keep your personal information safe, including your passwords," Mark Risher, Director of Product Management, Identity and User Security, Google, said in a blogpost. The company said it will soon start switching on 2FA for everyone automatically, as long as their Google account is set up in the right way, Engadget reported. Users can check whether that's the case for them through the Google account Security Checkup. Users will also have the option to opt-out. This is an expansion of an authentication feature Google has had for a while. It might ask users to confirm their identity with an Android prompt or through the Smart Lock, Gmail or Google app on iPhone, as long as you're signed in to the same account. Tapping a prompt is certainly easier than having to punch in a code and Google says it's more secure than other 2FA methods, the report said. Although this only works for Google accounts, it's highly recommended to turn on two-factor authentication on every account that supports it. In a blog post, Google noted that it has a secure password manager for Chrome, Android and iOS that can autofill your login details on sites and apps.