COVID-19

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Covid-19: Abu Dhabi’s latest Green List with 31 places adds six more Schengen countries

UAE|: Abu Dhabi: Abu Dhabi has updated its ‘Green List’ of countries, regions and territories, with the latest list effective from Wednesday, June 23 including 31 different places. Compared to the previous Green List effective since June 13, the new list includes Austria, Denmark, Finland, Italy, Norway, and Sweden. It leaves out Cuba, Kyrgyzstan and Russia. Read More Digital inroads continue into UAE’s healthcare sector COVID-19: 674 children in UAE participate in study to determine effectiveness of Sinopharm vaccine Quarantine exemption Passengers arriving from these destinations will be exempt from mandatory quarantine measures after landing in Abu Dhabi Emirate, and will only be required to undergo PCR testing upon arrival at Abu Dhabi Airport. Travellers who are vaccinated need to then undergo a follow-up PCR test on Day 6, whereas those who are not fully vaccinated will have to undergo follow-up PCR tests on Day 6 and Day 12, with Day 1 being the day of arrival. The destinations on the updated Green List include: 1. Australia 2. Austria 3. Azerbaijan 4. Bhutan 5. Brunei 6. China 7. Denmark 8. Finland 9. Germany 10. Greenland 11. Hong Kong (SAR) 12. Iceland 13. Israel 14. Italy 15. Japan 16. Malta 17. Mauritius 18. Moldova 19. Morocco 20. New Zealand 21. Norway 22. Portugal 23. Saudi Arabia 24. Singapore 25. South Korea 26. Spain 27. Sweden 28. Switzerland 29. Taiwan, Province of China 30. United States of America 31. Uzbekistan Applicable for arrivals The new Green List, announced by tourism sector regulator, the Department of Culture and Tourism (DCT) replaces the June 13 list. The DCT has also clarified that the Green List only applies to where passengers have arrived in the UAE from, not their citizenship. Inclusion on the list is subject to strict criteria of health and safety to ensure the well-being of the UAE community, it added.

GulfNews UAE

Covid-19: Abu Dhabi’s latest Green List with 31 places adds six more Schengen countries

UAE|: Abu Dhabi: Abu Dhabi has updated its ‘Green List’ of countries, regions and territories, with the latest list effective from Wednesday, June 23 including 31 different places. Compared to the previous Green List effective since June 13, the new list includes Austria, Denmark, Finland, Italy, Norway, and Sweden. It leaves out Cuba, Kyrgyzstan and Russia. Read More Digital inroads continue into UAE’s healthcare sector COVID-19: 674 children in UAE participate in study to determine effectiveness of Sinopharm vaccine Quarantine exemption Passengers arriving from these destinations will be exempt from mandatory quarantine measures after landing in Abu Dhabi Emirate, and will only be required to undergo PCR testing upon arrival at Abu Dhabi Airport. Travellers who are vaccinated need to then undergo a follow-up PCR test on Day 6, whereas those who are not fully vaccinated will have to undergo follow-up PCR tests on Day 6 and Day 12, with Day 1 being the day of arrival. The destinations on the updated Green List include: 1. Australia 2. Austria 3. Azerbaijan 4. Bhutan 5. Brunei 6. China 7. Denmark 8. Finland 9. Germany 10. Greenland 11. Hong Kong (SAR) 12. Iceland 13. Israel 14. Italy 15. Japan 16. Malta 17. Mauritius 18. Moldova 19. Morocco 20. New Zealand 21. Norway 22. Portugal 23. Saudi Arabia 24. Singapore 25. South Korea 26. Spain 27. Sweden 28. Switzerland 29. Taiwan, Province of China 30. United States of America 31. Uzbekistan Applicable for arrivals The new Green List, announced by tourism sector regulator, the Department of Culture and Tourism (DCT) replaces the June 13 list. The DCT has also clarified that the Green List only applies to where passengers have arrived in the UAE from, not their citizenship. Inclusion on the list is subject to strict criteria of health and safety to ensure the well-being of the UAE community, it added.

GulfNews Business

Business decision making sure got simpler post-COVID-19

Analysis|: There is a somewhat controversial, but influential, doctrine that has ruled the corporate world for a long time. Economist Milton Friedman proposed that the only social responsibility of a business is to increase profits and maximise returns to its shareholders. Not every CEO and business owner will agree with this approach, but it is impossible to deny its significance to business decision making. But that was before the pandemic. The outbreak proved an inflection point in the way we do business. Suddenly companies had to grapple with dwindling customers; they had to shave their workforces down to skeleton crews; and they had to sustain themselves in spite of supply chain disruptions and battered economies. This triggered a shift from a shareholder-centric model for decision making to a richer, good-governance model — one that puts the health and resilience of a business at its centre. In a post-COVID era, businesses should be geared for sustainability and for continuity. The framework for executive decision-making should be updated too, it should take into account future proofing and incorporate agility, decentralisation and data-driven insights. Improve responsiveness The COVID-19 crisis forced every executive to make quick decisions, often under pressure and with tremendous impact. These were mediated entirely by technology. This was the most important lesson, one that has permanently altered the decision-making process. So, organisations have now removed boundaries and broken down silos to streamline the decision-making process. Major business decisions are taken in single meetings, with minimal participants. In a post-COVID world, afflicted with flux, business decision making needs to be faster and more responsive. Bottlenecks If you want agility, you can’t micro-manage — and this applies to business decision making as well. Businesses have rightly traded in cumbersome bureaucracies for leaner, flatter organisational structures, peopled with empowered frontline leaders. Ideally, the company structure must be repurposed from a hierarchy to a dynamic network of teams. This will allow the system as a whole to respond lot faster to challenges as well as opportunities. Delegation and decentralisation is the key to post-pandemic decision making. Leverage data Organisations need to investigate the effects of the pandemic on their specific business, their specific industry. Decision making must take on a fact-based approach. Data-driven decisions can make an organisation more resilient — that’s how some businesses were able to maintain their dominant positions in the market during the pandemic while so many went into freefall. These organisations are also more likely to excel when the market recovers. Businesses should embed data, its analysis and reasoning into the everyday decision-making. Business decision making has changed more in the last year than it has in several decades. Just because these are unprecedented times doesn’t mean businesses have to rely on intuition or fortune to make good decisions… Nitesh Gupta null The writer is Managing Director, Metworld DMCC.