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Watch: How a 3-year-old Dubai boy trapped in a swimming pool was rescued

UAE|: Dubai: An Indian mother in Dubai has recounted the terrifying ordeal the family went through after her child’s arm got stuck in a swimming pool pipe for several hours. The incident, as reported by gulf News earlier, occurred on the night of September 14 when Thazeema Ashraf was sitting at the edge of the swimming pool at her residence, watching her three-and-a-half-year-old boy Ammar. Suddenly, she found that the arm of the child who was playing got stuck in the suction pipe at the bottom of the pool. See more IPL in UAE: Mumbai Indians prepare for Abu Dhabi opener against Chennai Super Kings IPL in UAE: Virat Kohli and Royal Challengers Bangalore relax from pool side to pool table More COVID-19 rapid screening centres opened with Dhs50 per test UAE-Israel peace deal signing ceremony in pictures She told Gulf News that she witnessed what could be a parent’s worst nightmare as she was at one point feared she was losing her child. Ammar after receiving treatment at the hospital Image Credit: Supplied “Things happened quickly. I was watching him play in the kids’ pool when his arm got trapped in the pipe. I jumped into the 60cm-deep pool to free him from the suction pipe, but all my attempts failed until Dubai Police came to our rescue,” Ashraf told Gulf News in an exclusive interview. She sought help from a nearby family, but they finally called 999 when all their attempts failed. A team from the Maritime Rescue Department and Difficult Mission Squad at Dubai Police went to the boy’s building located on Dubai-Al Ain road. According to Dubai Police, the boy opened the drain cover and his hand was sucked into the pipe. Officers and paramedics calmed down the parents and the child after finding out that there was no serious danger to the child’s life. According to Lt Col Ali Al Naqbi, Director, Maritime Rescue Department at Dubai Police, the water pressure prevented Ammar from freeing his arm. “We worked quickly to empty the pool manually, using buckets. The rescue operation lasted for two hours,” said Lt Col Al Naqbi in a statement. Using a jackhammer, the concrete at the bottom of the swimming pool and around the child’s arm was cracked, before making a hole at the bottom of the drain to equalise the air pressure and rescue the child without any serious injury. Ammar was rushed to Rashid Hospital for treatment and was discharged after a night’s stay. Ammar with his father Mohammad Ashraf Image Credit: Supplied Mohammad Ashraf, father of Ammar, told Gulf News, that he was working when the incident happened and helped the officers in emptying the water of the pool. “My son was continually crying during the rescue operation, but he was brave enough to laugh after they freed his arm. He was happy inside the ambulance, too, and laughed with the paramedics before reaching the hospital. He went to sleep thereafter,” Ashraf said. “My son is a gift from God to me and I’m happy that he is safe. No words can express my thanks to Dubai Police for the work they have done to rescue Ammar,” he added. Ammar’s mother, praised Dubai Police for the extensive rescue operation to save her son, describing them as heros. “I’m so thankful to Dubai Police because they came on time to rescue my son. For two hours, they worked tirelessly to pull out his arm without harming my child. They kept his head above the water and calmed us down,” Ashraf said. Advice to parents Ashraf urged all parents not only to monitor their children while in swimming pools, but that they must be with them inside to prevent any danger. “I was sitting at the edge of the swimming pool, watching my child swim. My advice to all parents is that don’t just sit there. We don’t know what a child may be doing once in the pool. I was continuously monitoring my child and in spite of that this incident happened. If I was in the pool when he slipped in, I could have pulled his arm in time,” she said. Using a jackhammer, the concrete at the bottom of the swimming pool and around the child’s arm was cracked, before making a hole at the bottom of the drain to equalise the air pressure and rescue the child without any serious injury. Image Credit: Supplied Dubai Police have urged parents to monitor their children and be with them in swimming pools if there is no lifeguard. “It is important to monitor the children all the time in swimming pools and call 999 in case of an emergency,” Lt Col Al Naqbi said Building’s management clarifies stand Sheffield Owners Association, that manages the residential building, told Gulf News that they stood by the rescue team in brainstorming about the best alternatives and, at the same time trying to comfort the panic-stricken parents. “Safety is paramount to us and even after adhering to access control and safety measures, we still find ourselves in the midst of a situation like this where a child’s hand was stuck after breaching the grill. Children are a precious gift, we request all parents in all communities to be vigilant about them as a few seconds [of inattention] can cause a disaster, the statement from Sheffield said.

GulfNews UAE

Watch: How a 3-year-old Dubai boy trapped in a swimming pool was rescued

UAE|: Dubai: An Indian mother in Dubai has recounted the terrifying ordeal the family went through after her child’s arm got stuck in a swimming pool pipe for several hours. The incident, as reported by gulf News earlier, occurred on the night of September 14 when Thazeema Ashraf was sitting at the edge of the swimming pool at her residence, watching her three-and-a-half-year-old boy Ammar. Suddenly, she found that the arm of the child who was playing got stuck in the suction pipe at the bottom of the pool. See more IPL in UAE: Mumbai Indians prepare for Abu Dhabi opener against Chennai Super Kings IPL in UAE: Virat Kohli and Royal Challengers Bangalore relax from pool side to pool table More COVID-19 rapid screening centres opened with Dhs50 per test UAE-Israel peace deal signing ceremony in pictures She told Gulf News that she witnessed what could be a parent’s worst nightmare as she was at one point feared she was losing her child. Ammar after receiving treatment at the hospital Image Credit: Supplied “Things happened quickly. I was watching him play in the kids’ pool when his arm got trapped in the pipe. I jumped into the 60cm-deep pool to free him from the suction pipe, but all my attempts failed until Dubai Police came to our rescue,” Ashraf told Gulf News in an exclusive interview. She sought help from a nearby family, but they finally called 999 when all their attempts failed. A team from the Maritime Rescue Department and Difficult Mission Squad at Dubai Police went to the boy’s building located on Dubai-Al Ain road. According to Dubai Police, the boy opened the drain cover and his hand was sucked into the pipe. Officers and paramedics calmed down the parents and the child after finding out that there was no serious danger to the child’s life. According to Lt Col Ali Al Naqbi, Director, Maritime Rescue Department at Dubai Police, the water pressure prevented Ammar from freeing his arm. “We worked quickly to empty the pool manually, using buckets. The rescue operation lasted for two hours,” said Lt Col Al Naqbi in a statement. Using a jackhammer, the concrete at the bottom of the swimming pool and around the child’s arm was cracked, before making a hole at the bottom of the drain to equalise the air pressure and rescue the child without any serious injury. Ammar was rushed to Rashid Hospital for treatment and was discharged after a night’s stay. Ammar with his father Mohammad Ashraf Image Credit: Supplied Mohammad Ashraf, father of Ammar, told Gulf News, that he was working when the incident happened and helped the officers in emptying the water of the pool. “My son was continually crying during the rescue operation, but he was brave enough to laugh after they freed his arm. He was happy inside the ambulance, too, and laughed with the paramedics before reaching the hospital. He went to sleep thereafter,” Ashraf said. “My son is a gift from God to me and I’m happy that he is safe. No words can express my thanks to Dubai Police for the work they have done to rescue Ammar,” he added. Ammar’s mother, praised Dubai Police for the extensive rescue operation to save her son, describing them as heros. “I’m so thankful to Dubai Police because they came on time to rescue my son. For two hours, they worked tirelessly to pull out his arm without harming my child. They kept his head above the water and calmed us down,” Ashraf said. Advice to parents Ashraf urged all parents not only to monitor their children while in swimming pools, but that they must be with them inside to prevent any danger. “I was sitting at the edge of the swimming pool, watching my child swim. My advice to all parents is that don’t just sit there. We don’t know what a child may be doing once in the pool. I was continuously monitoring my child and in spite of that this incident happened. If I was in the pool when he slipped in, I could have pulled his arm in time,” she said. Using a jackhammer, the concrete at the bottom of the swimming pool and around the child’s arm was cracked, before making a hole at the bottom of the drain to equalise the air pressure and rescue the child without any serious injury. Image Credit: Supplied Dubai Police have urged parents to monitor their children and be with them in swimming pools if there is no lifeguard. “It is important to monitor the children all the time in swimming pools and call 999 in case of an emergency,” Lt Col Al Naqbi said Building’s management clarifies stand Sheffield Owners Association, that manages the residential building, told Gulf News that they stood by the rescue team in brainstorming about the best alternatives and, at the same time trying to comfort the panic-stricken parents. “Safety is paramount to us and even after adhering to access control and safety measures, we still find ourselves in the midst of a situation like this where a child’s hand was stuck after breaching the grill. Children are a precious gift, we request all parents in all communities to be vigilant about them as a few seconds [of inattention] can cause a disaster, the statement from Sheffield said.

GulfNews Business

It's mistaken to assume more liquidity will create a job rush

Analysis|Analysis|: Central banks are undershooting their inflation targets. Why? Historically, monetary theory in economics has worked this way. The central bank in a country prints more money, figuratively, to increase the money supply in the economy and with it, hopefully, money circulation. To do that, the central bank would lower interest rates, which will increase money supply as banks start lending more money. See More China's rich seek bodyguards schooled in digital dark arts Photos: Pre-hispanic dancers perform energy cleansing rituals From the editors: Global Village to boost consumer confidence Photos: Palestinian female travel bloggers promote local tourism Alternatively, central banks could lower reserve ratio requirements, i.e. the money required to be kept by banks for whatever that they lend out. Recently, increasing money supply has been done by bonds’ purchases, which is also intended to put more cash in the hands of whomsoever is holding those bonds. For corporate holders, bonds are supposed to provide companies with leeway and cash to hire. After all, the relationship between lower unemployment levels and inflation has always been a classical one, identified and explained by the ‘Phillips Curve’. Namely, higher economic activity elevates inflation and lowers unemployment, which in turn raises inflation further, and so on. Problem is that bonds’ purchases are not real economic growth that creates jobs, lowers unemployment, and raises inflation. This is simply cash received by companies that could be spent on anything but hiring. Lately, such money has been increasingly spent on share buybacks. A spur for spending For other holders, bonds are expected to increase spending in the economy, subject to consumer and market sentiment that nourishes such spending. For instance, COVID-19 would be a deterrent to that, as individuals would rather hold on to their cash and bank savings until there is more certainty in the economy. Before COVID-19, and despite employment levels going up, inflation continued to lag behind. This can be partly blamed on the financial and economic scars left from the 2008 financial crisis and then the downturn caused by the virus. That is, the psychological impact makes individuals refrain from spending. Today, according to analysts, the relationship between currencies and exports can take part of the blame too. When money supply is increased, whether by lowering interest rates, the reserve ratio, or by purchasing bonds back from the market, a country’s currency gets devalued. When that happens, international trade theory suggests that a cheaper currency will encourage exports. A large enough effect could see exporters create jobs, and this takes us to the same classical connection where lower unemployment levels should lead to a higher inflation rate. Yet again, that does not seem to be the case. Why? Because international trade is not conducted in domestic currencies, and exports are not quoted in them. In other words, products and services in a country are usually quoted in the domestic currency. As the currency depreciates in value, average domestic prices go up, and thus inflation. Neutralising inflation However, the loss in the domestic currency’s value does two things. One, it lowers the domestic purchasing power in the economy as income is generated in the devalued domestic currency. Two, it promotes exports as long as the drop in the currency’s value is matched by an increase in the importers’ currency’s value. The effects from each offset one another, and inflation does not go up. Added to the above mix is the fact that many exports are quoted in internationally accepted currencies, such as the dollar. If so, then it does not matter how significant the drop in a currency’s value is as it may not necessarily increase exports. In such a case, what should have been a driver of inflation becomes another drag on it. As a result, the increase in money supply leads to nowhere and inflation targets remain out of reach. To conclude, the idea behind increasing money supply in an economy is to fuel economic activity, hence spending, which will increase inflation. This is the logic behind the Phillips Curve. Nevertheless, market sentiment can prevent that from happening as companies decide to not hire during uncertain times. Similarly, a negative market sentiment would discourage individuals from spending in an economy, whether they have always had jobs or they have just been hired because of the increase in money supply. Additionally, inflation targets are missed because of value variations between domestic and international currencies. That is, such variations dilute domestic purchasing power in an economy, whilst benefiting exporters in the same economy. Finally, quoting exports in international currencies can create another drag on inflation. The last thought that I want to leave you with: How can central banks meet their inflation targets? - Abdulnasser Alshaali is a UAE based economist.

GulfNews TOP

Days after Accord, UAE businesses are already pushing ahead with Project Israel

Business|: Dubai: Roll out the big names – just days into the signing of the Abraham Accord with Israel, the UAE’s investment push into that new market is already taking shape. First, there was the announcement by DP World – one of the UAE’s most global of enterprises – confirming that its new joint venture will make a bid for Israel’s strategically vital Haifa Port privatization. It was earlier in the year that the Israel Government gave the go-ahead for the privatization, a process that could be completed within the next two years. See More Dubai’s five-year Retirement Visa: It just got easier to apply IPL 2020 in UAE : Where and how to watch the cricketing action UAE Labour Law: How can I terminate a limited contract? The easiest way to book a COVID-19 test in the UAE Leading UAE banks have also found partners in Israel. Then, there was Abu Dhabi Investment Office’s decision to open a base in that country, and Dubai Diamond Exchange confirming an alliance with its counterpart – one by one, the UAE’s public sector entities are setting the agenda in doing business with the new market that has opened up for them. But they are not the only ones. Private sector gets into the act The Al Habtoor Group is working towards multiple “collaborations” with potential Israeli partners, including one with Israir Airlines to launch direct commercial flights to the UAE. “The possibilities are endless for both sides in our diversified fields and new ones - and we want to be present to grasp them,” said Khalaf Al Habtoor in a statement. Exploring the art of the deal... Khalaf Al Habtoor, Chairman of Al Habtoor Group, will hope to gain first mover advantage in Israel. The Group is considering multiple options, including in aviation. Image Credit: Al Habtoor Group But it need not be all about UAE investments flowing into that newly opened market. “Contrary to common opinion, I believe we’ll see as much investment coming from Israel into the UAE,” said Tasawar Ulhaq, CEO of KIKLABB Licensing and Workspace, owned by Dubai’s Port, Customs and Free Zone Corporation. (And the entity that offers companies registered with it access to office space on board the Queen Elizabeth II.) “We’ve already started to receive enquiries from Israeli companies interested in setting up in Dubai. Israel has advanced venture capital and tech sectors, so it’s no surprise that most of the interest we’ve received are from these two sectors. “In addition, we offer the right trade licenses with relevant business activities - and Israel has already been added to our systems.” Israeli businesses too will start making a move into the UAE... and the Queen Elizabeth II is all set to welcome them. KIKLABB Licensing and Workspace offers spaces on board the vessel for its licensed entities. Image Credit: Gulf News Archive But let’s not rush things Ulhaq says time – and space – must be given for businesses to firm up their plans. “After all, there are entry visa requirements, regular flight schedules, and other aspects that need to be implemented – but this will be beneficial for both countries,” he added. For UAE businesses that already have links with Jordan or the markets in North Africa, extending their reach into Israel would be relatively easy. And if DP World gets to win Haifa Port, a lot of things would slot into place. Tax breaks? Rizwan Sajan, Chairman of the building materials supplier Danube, is one who definitely would be interested… provided he gets some clarity on the tax structure there. “I believe the tax structure is high – but we still need to explore more on it,” he added. “Our focus is mainly on the Gulf markets because of the ease of doing business plus the one-time customs duty. There is a tax element in Muscat and Doha, but negligible.” A move into Israel will depend on the ease of doing business - that's where the UAE and Gulf markets score Rizwan Sajan of Danube Preferential treatment According to market sources in Israel, those questions related to tax on business activity can be surmounted. “The cost of operations in Israel is much cheaper,” said Ofir Bar-Noy of the recently created Emirates Israel Investment Group. “There are almost no license fees, and the joint registration of VAT and corporate tax has made starting a business in Israel much easier. In terms of taxes, Israel has also reduced the corporate income tax rate, making it cheaper.” The country has also made trading across borders easier by eliminating the ‘certificate of origin’ requirement. What about taxes? Israel’s tax structure is higher than in the UAE. The Corporate Income Tax is at 23 per cent. There are, however, preferential rates that can reduce the CIT to 16 per cent, 12 per cent and even 7.5 per cent. The VAT is at 17 per cent. Double taxation deal? At some point, Israel sources say, a double taxation treaty could be part of the governments’ agenda. “Good tax planning can help [UAE businesses] accrue most of the profit to the UAE and at low tax when doing business with Israel,” said Bar-Noy. “There is a huge potential for economic co-operation and investment, and we hope this will help transform growth in the region.” According to Matan Bar-Noy, CEO of Emirates Israel Investment Group, “Tech-led sectors would definitely see a lot of interest in investments, but beyond that, we also think Israel’s energy sector and banking would also see a boost by this agreement. With regional names already in conversations for tie-ups, we can see good opportunities even for the traditional sectors.” “There are no restrictions on foreign businesses. Foreigners can hold 100 per cent of Israeli companies.” Setting sail If DP World and its Israeli partner do win the Haifa Port contract, that would be the cue for more investment flows. Surender Singh Kandhari, Chairman of Al Dobowi Group, the tyre company, certainly sees it that way. “We contract-manufacture our own tyres in some of the largest tyre plants in Asia, using our own equipment and R&D,” he said. “We are one of the largest battery manufacturers in the region and we provide both automotive and industrial solutions. “[If] the DP World deal is finalised, we will begin our business operations. We are eagerly looking forward to do business in Israel.” It is too early to tell if there will be any material economic benefits. However, we expect these countries [UAE and Bahrain] will begin direct commercial flights with Israel and significantly increase cooperation in the areas of tourism, security, telecommunications, technology, health, education, financial services, and agriculture Latest update from Standard & Poor's on the post-Abraham Accord scenario